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Session Eight. . Killing Kryptonite of Critical Spirit. .

Keys that feed a critical spirit and destroy the presence of experiencing God’s power.

One: Cynical outlook instead of positive thoughts. Ask yourself: Am I focused on what’s wrong with the situation instead of focusing on God?

Two: _______________ perspective. Ask yourself: Have I already decided how I feel about the situation?

Three: Religious Perversion. Ask Yourself: Am I misusing or overvaluing something that God gave to help me?

Four: Procrastination. Ask Yourself: Am I telling myself that I’ll take care of this “someday” because I just don’t want to deal with it right now?

Five: Presence of _______________. Ask Yourself: Is my pride making me pretend that everything’s okay and that I don’t need God to help me handle this?

Declaration of Truth:

“Because of Christ’s redemption, I am a NEW CREATION of great worth. I am DEEPLY LOVED, COMPLETELY forgiven. Fully PLEASING, totally ACCEPTED by God and absolutely COMPLETE in Christ.”

October 22, 2018 v1

Session Eight – Killing Kryptonite of Critical Spirit

Keys that feed a critical spirit and destroy the presence of experiencing God’s power.

One: Cynical outlook instead of positive thoughts. Ask yourself: Am I focused on what’s wrong with the situation instead of focusing on God?

Two: _______________ perspective. Ask yourself: Have I already decided how I feel about the situation?

Three: Religious Perversion. Ask Yourself: Am I misusing or overvaluing something that God gave to help me?

Four: Procrastination. Ask Yourself: Am I telling myself that I’ll take care of this “someday” because I just don’t want to deal with it right now?

Five: Presence of _______________. Ask Yourself: Is my pride making me pretend that everything’s okay and that I don’t need God to help me handle this?

Declaration of Truth:

“Because of Christ’s redemption, I am a NEW CREATION of great worth. I am DEEPLY LOVED, COMPLETELY forgiven. Fully PLEASING, totally ACCEPTED by God and absolutely COMPLETE in Christ.”

October 17, 2018

Session Eight – Killing Kryptonite of Critical Spirit

Keys that feed a critical spirit and destroy the presence of experiencing God’s power.

  1. Cynical outlook instead positive thoughts.
    1. Ask yourself: Am I focused on what’s wrong with the situation instead of focusing on God?
  2. _______________ perspective.
    1. Ask yourself: Have I already decided how I feel about the situation?
  3. Religious Perversion.
    1. Ask Yourself: Am I misusing or overvaluing something that God gave to help me?
  4. Procrastination.
    1. Ask Yourself: Am I telling myself that I’ll take care of this “someday” because I just don’t want to deal with it right now?
  5. Presence of _______________.
    1. Ask Yourself: Is my pride making me pretend that everything’s okay and that I don’t need God to help me handle this?

Declaration of Truth:

“Because of Christ’s redemption, I am a NEW CREATION of great worth. I am DEEPLY LOVED, COMPLETELY forgiven. Fully PLEASING, totally ACCEPTED by God and absolutely COMPLETE in Christ.”

October 10, 2018

Becoming powerfully formed men of God means:

  1. Fanning into flame the power gift of the Spirit God has given us. (Reference 2 Timothy 1:5-6)
  2. Embracing that God has given us everything needed to live as godly men. (Reference 2 Peter 1:3)
  3. The power of receiving the words of validation as a man of God.
  4. The power of allowing the Kingdom of God to confront our kingdom of internal comforts.
  5. The power of not staying in the shame and trusting in Jesus’ name – “I am … Willing.”

NETA Digital Declutter Presentation

NETA LogoPresentation for Nebraska Educational Technology Association

LaVista, NE – April 24th, 2014

Handout
Google Presentation

Take control of your digital life! Would you like to get a handle on your files, email, passwords, social networks, contacts, calendar, bookmarks, notes, books, photos, media, blogs, not to mention all your extra cables and accessories? We’ll explore some tools to get you started on your journey to an organized digital life!

My Digital Declutter website!

Ed Tech Leadership: C.A.R.E

 
community-pictureYou have a passion for education. You have a passion for using technology in your classroom or district. To be more effective and efficient with the students you serve. To grow and use the skills, knowledge, and understanding you have to give students the best opportunities possible. You are the ed tech leaders not only in your classroom but in your district. You are the one others come to for advice, tips, help and support. You have a responsibility to your students and others in the district and community. So many hats, so little time! How do you manage all of this? Let me propose a framework of C.A.R.E.

 
C – Community
Help build community through communication and collaboration. Be intentional about setting aside time at staff meetings and providing opportunities for building community outside the school day. Find hashtags in Twitter to support your curricular area and/or areas of professional passion. (Google search “educational hashtags“.) Seek out Google Plus communities or build one of your own. Like ISTE, ASCD, or Edutopia on Facebook. Share with your classroom, colleagues, and others in your community. As Henry Ford said, “Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress, and working together is success.” Start building and using your communities today!
 
A – Assessment
We all enter into education and especially technology at differing levels. Assessing where you are and focusing on goals for your professional growth is key. There are many roads to travel and trails to blaze in the ed tech world. Don’t be overwhelmed by the many paths you may take – just pick one area to focus on and go! There are many tools to help you and others in your district self assess and set priorities for growth. ISTE has NETS for students, teachers, administrators, and coaches. Atomic Learning has free and paid resources you can use. Krista Moroder has the EdTechChallenge.com that you could use as a framework to help you focus. Find out what is important to you in your classroom and/or district and assess your level of skill for future growth. 
 
R – Resources
You have run across hundreds if not thousands of resources to help you and your students be more efficient and effective with technology. Building your resource library can seem daunting but there are many tools to help your organize your digital resources. First, find out what your district supports. Are you using an LMS such as Moodle or Schoology? Does your district use Google Apps for Education or eBackpack? Next, lean on your ESU and find out what they have to support your resource library. Safari Montage is a great media library at your disposal. And then, if you must, create your own site of resources for yourself and your students using WordPress, Google Sites, or Wikispaces. More and more educators are also turning to social media to create Facebook or Google Plus pages and communities. Start collecting and organizing your digital resources – you won’t regret spending the time to be more effective and efficient.
 
E – Education
Keep growing yourself and learning new things! Education and technology are changing at break-neck speeds and the only way to stay on top of it is to participate in professional development opportunities. PD is changing and there are so many new opportunities to fit your busy life. There are still the traditional inservices that your district or ESU’s provide. NETA is also great resource and is growing to reach more and more educators by providing not only the spring conference but the fall conference as well as membership benefits throughout the year. You’ll also find websites, webinars, online courses, MOOCS and more. The key is to find out where you are and align PD opportunities with what works best in your life. 
 
I couldn’t be in a better place. I love the ed tech field for all it’s challenges and even more, the educational leaders who are passionate about providing our students with the best learning environments so they may flourish when they spread their wings and make their mark on the world. 
 
You make it happen! #YouMatter
 
Jason Everett
NETA President

Evernote: My Second Brain

I love productivity apps and software to help me get things done. Whether that be at home or at the office, I’ll try just about any new utility that claims to help one be more productive. But I have never found one with as much flexibility and that works like this. Welcome to my second brain: Evernote. It’s with me pretty much all the time. Whether I am sitting at my computer, doodling on my iPad, or running errands around town. It’s that app that is on my computers, in the cloud, and on all my devices.

evernote-300x300

So what do I use Evernote for? Here are a few of the top things I use it for:

  • Random thoughts and ideas. I keep my ideas, blog posts, writing prompts, and just about anything that comes to mind in an Evernote notebook.
  • Meeting Notes. I sit through a lot of meetings. Way too many! Although I use Google Docs more when real-time collaborating, I use Evernote for my personal notes. It’s just like my paper notebook, only electronic. And great to be able to tag and organize all these meeting notes in an intuitive way.
  • To Do lists and Checklists. Being able to easily create lists is a bonus for me. And an added perk is being able to set reminders and due dates!
  • Weekend Planner. There is always something to do around the house. Evernote keeps my projects at home organized and at the ready.
  • Travel Planner. Whether I am going to a conference across the country or a NETA meeting in Omaha, Evernote helps me keep my confirmation numbers, directions, reservations, interesting sessions, and anything else I need at the ready. And I always know where to find it!
  • Bookmarks. With the help of the Evernote Web Clipper, this is my bookmark manager. It works in my workflow. I store bookmarks as ideas for certain projects I’m working on so keeping them organized with tags or in a project folder works well for me.
  • Paperless Office. At home and at work, every piece of paper I have (bills, letters, drawings, paper notes, etc.) goes through my ScanSnap scanner and into Evernote. When I am away from my scanner, I take photos of documents, business cards, Post-its, and whatever ever else I may need. These are then searchable documents that I can go back to where ever I am in the world.
  • Collaboration/Communications. I not only share certain notes with folks but also use a shared folder with my son. Either of us can add, remove or edit notes but its a great way for me to share his chore list or projects that he is working on.
  • Reading List. I like to think of this as the electronic version of the basket of reading material next to my Lazyboy at home. It’s that place I can store PDFs or websites I want to go back to and read more about.
  • Email Important messages. If I need to deal with an email message, I forward it to my To Do folder in Evernote. Evernote really becomes not a part of my workflow, but THE workflow.

Tips to make Evernote more useful:

  • Use it on all your devices: computer, web, tablet, phone. Evernote automatically syncs with all of them.
  • Install the browser plugins: Evernote Web Clipper, Clearly.
  • Save your Evernote email address as a contact in your phone.
  • Be consistent – use it regularly and make it your workflow.
  • Use Notebooks and Tags to help your organize your notes and ideas.
  • Turn on location tracking – more useful than you think!
  • Use other apps like Penultimate and Skitch that integrate with Evernote.
  • Take pictures of documents, business cards, Post-it’s, and hand written notes.
  • Share notes and notebooks with friends, colleagues, and family.

Evernote can be so much more than just your electronic notebook. Planning a conference? A trip? Collecting ideas?What will you make Evernote do for you?

Get a month of Evernote Premium for FREE!
(You’ll still be able to use the standard version after your month.)

4 Simple Rules for an Effective Presentation

Microphone-Audience
 
Is he really reading these slides to me?” 
“What did he just say?” 
Why am I here again?” 
“How much longer can I sit through this presentation?” 
 
If you’ve sat through enough presentations, I am sure these are questions you have asked yourself. Numbed by the endless • bullet • points and lulled by the drone of the presenter. I’d like to share what I believe are 4 rules that will make your presentation worthwhile and engaging. With proper preparation and these 4 rules, you’ll hit it out of the park!

 
1) Share Your Story
Your presentation should tell a compelling story to your audience. What is the story you have to tell? Share your story with me as if we are sitting across the table from each other. Know who I am and why I am there. Connect to each person in the room with the story you are telling. 
 
2) Use Visuals Properly
Your slides should support your story. NOT repeat what you are saying. I can read. Limit the use of text in your visuals – unless it IS the visual. Use slides to share images, animations, and video that will enhance your message. Typical misnomer – don’t use too many slides. I disagree – use as many slides as you NEED to support your story! I’ve sat through one of the most compelling presentations that had over a hundred slides and presented in 50 minutes.
 
3) Keep Me Engaged With Activities
Give me something to do. Break up your presentation into manageable chunks that I can remember by having me do something or share my thoughts with the person sitting next to me. If there are only a few in your audience, try to get us up and moving. Blood flow helps retention! (And may keep me awake!)
 
4) Provide Me Resources
Give me something that I can put my hands on and walk away with. Give me a handout, graphic organizer, or workbook. If the group is too large or you want to go green, give me a website I can use or videos I can watch to help support what you are sharing with me. Providing only the sides as a handout is not an effective resource.
 
Bonus: Tie these rules together! For example, periodically use a slide with a visually interactive PollEverywhere question that I could take part in and be engaged in the presentation. Create a handout or graphic organizer that allows me to take notes or capture key concepts that also has a website listed for further resources. Pause in the middle of a video to allow for reflection or foreshadowing and share my thoughts with someone next to me. Enlist a social media moderator to monitor an official #hashtag throughout your presentation.
 
Good luck with your next presentation! Have other tips? Please share in the comments!

The Power of Connecting

 

Virtual Field Trip

I recently overheard a teacher, Jeff Paige, telling another colleague about his trip to ISTE this summer. He was describing all the wonderful opportunities he encountered and learned about in San Antonio and one statement popped out at me that inspired me to write about this topic. As he was pointing to the jack on the wall, he exclaimed, “If there is a network connection in the classroom, you are not the smartest person in the room!” That struck a chord with me. As I thought about it, there are 7 billion people in this world who can share their unique experiences with your students. And those students have more than 7 billion people they can share their unique talents and expertise with! A truly global and authentic audience to collaborate and learn with.

Making connections is really about growing relationships. Finding others with similar interests, or even dissimilar interests. Finding others who agree with you and who don’t agree with you. Finding others who can empathize with you, or give you a good kick to get going! Finding others who are willing to share of themselves and who are willing to let you share your thoughts, opinions, passions, or perspectives. Finding others to collaborate with, who help you grow as a person–and as a professional. To me, these are critical keys to making connections.

In the world we currently live in, the virtual connections are seemingly endless. You can tweet a fellow teacher or techie on Twitter. You can Hangout with a group of people in Google+. You can Skype with another classroom in a foreign land. You can dialog about a topic on a blog and you can share projects with teachers on Pinterest. The sky’s the limit.  Although it can seem daunting at first, start simply and just set a goal to make a connection. Talk to someone in your building, your district, or another NETA member who may be doing something similar. Then go out and do it!

Virtual field trips are an excellent opportunity to test the waters and get classrooms involved in connecting with the outside world. As educators, know that local or ESU distance learning coordinators are available to help uncover the hundreds of activities that may enhance curricular areas. In one classroom in Kearney, Graci sat riveted in her seat as she learned about Jesse James and his gang derailing a train in Iowa in 1873. Mike Irwin, from the Durham Museum, shows artifacts to the students, as they listen to the story of Engineer John Rafferty, dying in the crash and the outlaws taking $2,337 from the train. The students do a present day crime scene investigation of the incident to learn more about train robbers of the old west.

Another option is connecting with other classrooms, teachers or experts around the world using a webcam or other video equipment. A student, Fernanda, and her class have been studying different cultures in their classroom and have been preparing questions they would like to ask people living in different countries. After connecting and interviewing people in Brazil, Kenya, Mexico and other locations, Fernanda and her class shared that they loved meeting new people from these countries and enjoyed the many new things about where they live.

Jeannette Carlson, from Bellevue, is introducing her students to entrepreneurship via experts on Google Hangouts. Alison Anderson is creating a global book club for her middle schools students. Will Deyamport is collaborating with other teachers on lesson plans for his class. Louise Morgan is participating in the International Dot Day project by sharing the World Museum’s World Dots Project Scratch animation with her students. Teachers all over are using the power of connecting to others around the globe to give their students opportunities they would never have otherwise experienced.

My challenge to you is to connect to someone outside your classroom walls. Learn and collaborate with them. Find a mentor who can help you traverse this virtual world. Then, begin connecting your students. Help them realize the power of connecting with others. Let them learn from experts all around the globe and give them an opportunity to share and to shine in this new, ever changing world.

 

Google Apps: A Swiss Army Knife and More!

You have all seen, if not used, a Swiss Army knife. The tool of tools. If you are going to carry one tool, this is it. Useful at home, at the office, or out on the trail. So many creative ways to use this ingenious, original multi-tool. That’s what Google Apps for Education is for the connected educator and the connected student. If you were to have one web utility, it would have to be Google Apps!

Swiss Army Knife

The core suite of utilities would be what I would call the original Swiss Army knife for Google Apps: Calendar, Contacts, Drive & Docs, Gmail, Groups, and Sites. With these few tools, you can survive almost any situation. These core apps should be the foundation of all productivity and collaboration for the school. Getting more done with as many folks as it takes.

Learn how to make these core services work for you in the classroom. http://learn.googleapps.com

Then there are the additional services available to schools. This is the mega Swiss Army knife of web apps. With over 60 additional services, there is not much you can’t do with Google Apps for Education.  Here is a list of a few of the additional services that come with a Google Apps for Education account.

Giant Swiss Army Knife

That’s not to say there aren’t other web services that are great for education. There are! But if you have this Swiss Army knife in your pocket, you’ll be ready for just about anything!